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Tax Residency - are you considered an Irish resident?


Tax residency is an important consideration for individuals living and working in Ireland, as it determines their tax obligations to the Irish government. The concept of tax residency is complex, and it can be difficult to determine whether or not an individual is considered a tax resident of Ireland.


In this blog, we'll explore what tax residency is, how it's determined in Ireland, and what tax obligations it entails.


What is Tax Residency?

Tax residency is the term used to describe the country or countries in which an individual is considered to be a resident for tax purposes. Tax residency is important because it determines which country has the right to tax an individual's income and assets. In general, an individual is considered to be a tax resident of a country if they meet certain criteria related to their presence in that country.


How is Tax Residency Determined in Ireland?

In Ireland, tax residency is determined by the number of days an individual spends in the country during a tax year. A tax year in Ireland runs from January 1st to December 31st. An individual is considered to be a tax resident of Ireland if they meet one of the following criteria:

1. They spend 183 days or more in Ireland during the tax year.

2. They spend 280 days or more in Ireland over a period of two consecutive tax years, with a minimum of 30 days in each year.

It's important to note that the above criteria apply to both Irish and non-Irish nationals. Additionally, there are some exceptions to these rules for individuals who work in the transport industry or who are on temporary assignments in Ireland.

What are the Tax Obligations for Irish Tax Residents?

If you are considered to be a tax resident of Ireland, you will be subject to Irish tax on your worldwide income and assets. This means that you will need to pay tax on any income you earn from employment, self-employment, rental properties, or investments, regardless of where in the world that income was earned.

In addition to paying tax on your income, you may also be required to file an Irish tax return. This will depend on the amount of income you earn and whether or not you have any Irish tax credits or reliefs that you can claim. If you do need to file a tax return, you will need to do so by the deadline specified by the Irish Revenue Commissioners.


Tax residency is an important consideration for individuals living and working in Ireland. If you spend a significant amount of time in Ireland, you may be considered to be a tax resident of the country and will be subject to Irish tax on your worldwide income and assets. It's important to understand the criteria for determining tax residency in Ireland and to comply with any tax obligations you may have. If you have any questions about tax residency or your tax obligations in Ireland, get in touch with CloudAccounts here!

 


Alan is a Chartered Accountant and Tax Adviser and the founder of CloudAccounts, a remote practice that provides support for business owners, PAYE workers and anyone who requires professional assistance with their tax and accounting matters.


Alan also offers consultations and corporate seminars, to offer businesses and their employees' simple practical advice in easy-to-understand presentations, allowing employees to feel valued, supported and make the most of the company benefits. If you require further information please contact CloudAccounts today.


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